Welcome to symthic forums! We would love if you'd register!
You don't have to be expert in bit baking, everyone is more than welcome to join our community.

You are not logged in.

Hey! If this is your first visit on symthic.com, also check out our weapon damage charts.
Currently we have charts for Battlefield 3, Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, Medal of Honor: Warfighter and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3

  • "spaceflaffy" started this thread

Posts: 44

Date of registration
: Jun 9th 2016

Platform: PC

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 1

  • Send private message

1

Saturday, September 10th 2016, 3:02am

What can I use spreadsheets for?

I don't work with much data. I am a college student who has access to the entirety of the Microsoft Office suite of programs. My opinion is spreadsheets are useful if I know what to use them for. I take biology, computer programming, tennis and early Western civilization.

NoctyrneSAGA

PvF 2017 Champion

(9,349)

Posts: 6,932

Date of registration
: Apr 3rd 2012

Platform: PC

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 19

  • Send private message

2

Saturday, September 10th 2016, 3:12am

Data Browser

Passive Spotting is the future!

With this, I'll rid MGO3 of infestation. Sans bad gameplay MGO3 will be torn asunder. And then it shall be free. People will suffer, of course - a phantom pain.

Reddit and Konami will rewrite the records... And I will be demonized in human memory. But... The thirst for good gameplay that I have planted will infest MGO3. No one can stop it now. The Rebalance Mod will unleash that thirst unto the future.


Are you a scrub?

If it flies, it dies™.

Miffyli

Symthic Developer

(5,875)

Posts: 3,610

Date of registration
: Mar 21st 2013

Platform: PC

Location: __main__, Finland

Reputation modifier: 16

  • Send private message

3

Saturday, September 10th 2016, 12:40pm

Spreadsheet softwares are a must if you do something even slightly statistical, financial or just something that requires storing numbers at certain intervals etc. They offer bunch of tools for visualizing and understanding the data ("insight"). Honestly I don't know other newcomer-friendly way to get into storing datas and handling them. Some say they are limiting and only for "newbs", but honestly if you know the features eg. Excel provides you can do a great deal with it.

PS: I rarely use spreadsheets myself as I do my stuff with Python and R (and *grumble* MatLab). They are better for advanced and custom data handling, but worse for outputting the data in meaningful form.
Links to users' thread list who have made analytical/statistical/mathematical/cool posts on Symthic:
  • 3VerstsNorth - Analysis of game mechanics in BF4 (tickrates, effects of tickrate, etc)
  • leptis - Analysis of shotguns, recoil, recoil control and air drag.
  • Veritable - Scoring of BF4/BF1 firearms in terms of usability, firing and other mechanics.
  • Miffyli - Random statistical analysis of BF4 battlereports/players and kill-distances. (list is cluttered with other threads).
Sorry if your name wasn't on the list, I honestly can't recall all names : ( . Nudge me if you want to be included

ViperFTW

Suidae cathexis

(2,734)

Posts: 9,711

Date of registration
: Jul 1st 2012

Platform: PC

Location: Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 20

  • Send private message

4

Saturday, September 10th 2016, 11:59pm

You can also resize the boxes and use them for plans on Minecraft :)

Everybody's Favourite Worthless Support and LMG Fan! :thumbsup:



Song currently stuck in my head is: 3rd Testament by Septicflesh!

  • "spaceflaffy" started this thread

Posts: 44

Date of registration
: Jun 9th 2016

Platform: PC

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 1

  • Send private message

5

Sunday, September 11th 2016, 5:23am

PS: I rarely use spreadsheets myself as I do my stuff with Python and R (and *grumble* MatLab). They are better for advanced and custom data handling, but worse for outputting the data in meaningful form.

I know what MatLab is; that's what engineers use. I saw Bill O' Reilly try to learn it but the YTMND didn't end so well. My rationale for starting this topic was every time I learn how to use Excel, I forget because I don't work with numbers. I've learned the software twice in my lifetime and I do not use it to this day. I can just download a template from the second I start Excel and my needs are quickly met, so I can't see myself teaching myself to use spreadsheets unless I work with data.

Posts: 282

Date of registration
: Mar 17th 2015

Platform: PC

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 8

  • Send private message

6

Sunday, September 11th 2016, 1:04pm

I don't work with much data. I am a college student who has access to the entirety of the Microsoft Office suite of programs. My opinion is spreadsheets are useful if I know what to use them for. I take biology, computer programming, tennis and early Western civilization.



As an extensive spreadsheet user the answer to your question is ... for everything .

Within certain limits in size... not very restrictive (EXCEL support 1,048,576 rows by 16,384 columns and 32,767 characters per cell) and a plethora of formulas, logical relationships, graphics, analyzers ....
and other limits on the approach (EXCEL is not a good tool to produce customer invoices in an electric company. It can be done, but it is not efficient).

I think the key to the usefulness of spreadsheets is more philosophical.

Programming your need to have an idea, more or less general, than what you want to do when you write the first line of code.

With a spreadsheet you can start working without that vision. You have for example two columns of data (perhaps 1.000 data pairs). First you analyze their statistical parameters, maybe you represent a graph ... and with partial vision that decide it would be a good idea to fit a curve. Then you wonder about the nature of the residual values ​​with respect to the fitted curve, etc, etc ... This iterative work is very easy with a spreadsheet and more difficult with a program (at the end you will pay that lack of general vision in the organization of the spreadsheet, but that is other question :), almost always solved with a second better organized spreadsheet :) ).

There are many tools that help the understanding of the structure of the data. One of them (just as an example) is the Solver. What should be the value of the cell XX to get a specific value of the YY cell. Powerful. Other tools like Macros, Visual basic, complements, etc... give a lot of power to the spreadsheet.

But you need some "creativity" to exploit all the resources it provides.

The conclusion is that a spreadsheet helps a lot in data analysis ( to understand). All is in view, original data, intermediate results and final results.

The desideratum of a knowledge process would be: spreadsheet to understand data and program to exploit knowledge systematically.

  • "spaceflaffy" started this thread

Posts: 44

Date of registration
: Jun 9th 2016

Platform: PC

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 1

  • Send private message

7

Sunday, September 11th 2016, 9:59pm

I learned how to use Excel twice in my lifetime and I forgot twice. It's like society doesn't want me to make use of productivity software that isn't Microsoft Word or OneNote or PowerPoint; these are applications that any shmoe can use and to great effect with no training like I had at two points. But, now I know how great Excel is for budgeting and things.

Posts: 15

Date of registration
: Aug 11th 2016

Platform: Xbox One

Location: London, UK

Battlelog:

Reputation modifier: 1

  • Send private message

8

Monday, September 12th 2016, 3:34pm

Last month I learnt for the very first time how to create Pivot Tables and Pivot Graphs in Excel :) A brilliant way to present or summarise data for people who make their decisions based solely on numbers, haha. Joke.
Maybe Pivot Tables come in handy for analysing your survey data when you write your bachelor or master thesis?

Anyhow, here's the wikipedia page on Pivot Tables if you wonder:
Pivot table - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia