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  • "i-fantasy" started this thread

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Saturday, March 1st 2014, 11:12pm

Defuse Tactics

Hello all,

Lately I've fallen in love with this game mode. It's so tense, so invigorating, that I can't help but love it. It's helped me grow as a players to establish heightened situational awareness, positioning and patience. Really, patience is key to winning a match. Sometimes I go 0-0 or 1-0 just watching a lane; yet, it's still quite fun, knowing I have to be super aware of everything that goes on around me.

My preferred setup is the M416 with a RDS, silencer, ergo grip. I chose the M416 because versatility is important to me when I change positions extremely fast, silencer because staying off the map is crucial, ergo because the moving spread buff really helps in head-on CQC firefights. The AEK, silenced and ergo grip is better for me when I am the one transporting the bomb, however rarely that may be. Because of the unforgiving no-respawn mechanic, guns with fast reloads tend to be better in this gamemode. Something like the FAMAS, which may grant you enhanced 1v1 performance, will undoubtedly kill you near a bomb point.

Recon is this game mode is also hugely useful with a TUGS. I like to run the ACW-R, set myself up near a bomb point, and camp for the attackers. However, it's not nearly as good on the attacking team as it is on the defending team. My advice to all is to leave the BASRs at home; most engagements are pretty close, unless you're going xX1337QUICKSCOPEZZZXx or WEED_N_NOSCOPEZZ. In that case, you're dead to me.

I'm never the bomb carrier on my team. For some reason, I let my teammates take the bomb; it just seems like too much of a responsibility. I prefer approaching the objectives from the sides and supporting the actual bomb carrier from afar, using my M416. For this role, should I switch to something else, like a DMR? Engagements never seem to go beyond 50m, where they reign supreme. Besides, I do occasionally find myself surprised in CQC scenarios, where the ROF really helps.

I've noticed how much mics really help in this game mode. I don't own one myself, yet I'm on the brink of deciding if I should get one. Yesterday, I played with two other randoms who were using mics. We coordinated our attacks, supported each other with various gadgets, and at one point we kept up a revive train throughout the match, where we just steamrolled everyone in sight. I'll have to find friends who play this game mode, because it's just too much fun. I mean, it's already fun to play in a tight knit squad, yet this game mode brings the adrenaline packed feeling with the heavy teamwork. That leads me to my other point: This game mode really doesn't have that many idiots. Yeah, you get the occasional sniper who camps in the deployment, but most people playing have a basic understanding of tactics and gunplay.

You might notice your SPM or your K/D or any other stat taking a hit if you're some ESL pro player with ridiculous stats. In that case, there's not much you can do unless you want to run with a knife 24/7 to preserve your precious ACE 52 KPM. This is a mode that rewards more on smart thinking and good positioning, and less about ''lighting quick reflexes''.

So please, tell me your strategies and weapon setups, I'd really like to hear them. Is there a wall you can C4 that gives you a flanking route, or a certain area you can set yourself up for overwatch? Tell me everything.





\
"Teamwork is essential; it gives the enemy other people to shoot at."

2

Sunday, March 2nd 2014, 1:13am

The best strategy I have ever seen in Defuse was when some random team mate launched a UCAV as soon as the game started, and killed at least 4 of the 5 on the other team, every game every time lol

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Sunday, March 2nd 2014, 3:26am

I haven't actually played this gamemode yet because it's essentially Counter-Strike and if I want to play that I'll just play Counter-Strike...


That being said, a lot of the tactics and strategies carry over.



One of the most important things as an attacker is to keep the other team guessing. Never do the same tactic twice in a row unless that is the best course of action or if you are sucking the other team into a pattern to throw them a hard curve-ball.
As the bomb planter, don't think you have to move with your team. Let the team rush ahead while you bring up the rear several seconds later. Let your whole team go A and draw the other team there while you go B and plant there.
Maybe even just play it slow, have your whole team wait in the spawn area and "delay" for a bit. Let the other team get worried and start pushing up, and when they do something stupid push them down and rush in.
Push A, then fall back and push B. Push A, then fall back and push A again. The more unpredictable yet coordinated your team is the better, and as you said mics are pretty critical for that.


As a defender, it is rarely a good idea to leave a bomb site unwatched. Even if all you can send over is one person to watch B, it's worth it if the attacking team has several people alive.
Know the routes and the flanks, so if someone calls for help because of enemies spotted you don't just run in blindly.
Be on your toes for trickery. If the enemy team pushes hard and falls back prematurely, expect a trick. Remember, if the clock runs out you win, so it is in your best interest not to push up for a total victory and just stay back and defend.
Now obviously not letting the bomb get planted is better than defusing it, so some aggression is needed. Just don't push too far.
Try to stay in pairs, individually you can get picked off easily but in pairs you have a better chance while staying more mobile than a whole group. Remember, all it takes is one enemy to plant the bomb and while defusing you are a sitting duck. A smart attacker will bait the defender with the ticking bomb and pop their face off when they start to defuse, 1v1 with the bomb planted is very advantageous to the attacker.
When operating alone, be slow, be careful, and make good use of cover. Don't be afraid to fall back without firing a shot, take up a better position, and call for help.
In CS the solo operator is usually the mid player. 2 go A, 2 go B, 1 goes mid. It's primarily a recon/support role as you communicate to your team the flanks and pushes of the enemy team as you see them, and it is your job to move in to whichever side is "weak" or just run on a flank to assist in stopping the main push.
That was usually my job when I played competitive CS.

Watch some CS videos on YouTube, the competitive scene for CS is huge and the tactics are very usable in other games.
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This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Watcher-45" (Mar 2nd 2014, 3:34am)


  • "i-fantasy" started this thread

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Sunday, March 2nd 2014, 4:26am

The best strategy I have ever seen in Defuse was when some random team mate launched a UCAV as soon as the game started, and killed at least 4 of the 5 on the other team, every game every time lol


That's just dirty... Yet I'm still going to try that out :thumbup:

@Watcher-45

I'm aware the game mode is derived from CS, it's just that I've never played CS before, nor do I know anything about it, other than it is a very skill intensive game. You're right about constantly changing tactics, I never run the identical copy of what I do before. As I've said before, since some players playing this game mode are not the 99% of idiots that occupy the CQ/DOM fast paced action, you'll notice they'll adapt their tactics to avoid making that mistake twice. I do sometimes run a similar version of what I ran last time, except I make some modification to improve the strategy. For example, I was playing on Paracel Storm last night guarding B (the bomb point in the isolated house). I set up shop with a TUGS on the first map, and I hung behind the house with an ACW-R. Sure enough, I notice two red dots converging on my point. One tries to arm the objective, betraying the fact that he is the bomb carrier, so I peeked the door and killed him. Enemy number two is now aware of my position so he comes inside. I run around the side of the house, and lie in the trenches. He comes out, looks around and a single burst of my ACW-R kills him. Second round, I repeat the TUGS strategy, but I hide in the trenches with an AK-5C. Three enemies sprint towards the house, oblivious to their right, so I attempt to engage them. I kill two of them, but the third escapes behind some crates. I threw two minis side by side near the crates, effectively killing him. On the third round, I switch up the TUGS strategy to placing it in the crates near the middle. I only see one enemy coming towards B, so I down him with ease. Realizing, they've focused their assets on A, I sprint towards the point to be confronted by two enemies side by side. This is why I like the M416; the decent ROF helps in surprise engagements. Unfortunately, I die, only wounding one enemy severely. We lost that round, presumably because I was outplayed by focusing too much on B.

I disagree with your statements regarding being the bomb planter. You WANT to stick with your team, but that doesn't mean being bunched side by side with two pre-pubescent children with AEKs. I like to run the sides of the map when I'm attacking; he who controls the flanks controls the game. If the majority of your team rushes B, then by all mean, go B, as having support is always welcome, but hang back a little, provide some covering fire but don't get in the thick of things. The reason I don't try to push an objective solo is because I'm afraid there will be a lone wolf camping the objective, while I'll be a sitting duck arming the objective.

Playing this mode slowly will get you nowhere as an attacker. Your greatest chance is the start, where the defenders don't have time to set up properly. I'm not advocating to run headlong in groups of Assaults, but thinking quickly will give you an edge in attacking. Try planning your strategy in the brief respite between games, and try to visualize certain scenarios. Of course, you'll never be fully prepared for anything they do. Only experience can surmount that. However, don't prolong the time unless you've got a really good strategy. Of course, I might be completely wrong.

As for the positioning tactics you recommended, I'll try that out. Does the mid player camp a house/crate and relay information from there, or are they usually mobile? The one problem I see of running the solo operator is if a certain area is compromised; will you be able to arrive to the objective on time? Because CS might have closer bomb points, or some other variable to allow that tactic.
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Sunday, March 2nd 2014, 4:47am

UCAV.

Or, if you're going for style points, SUAV.

I've found that the most viable set up is with a reliable DMR (ie QBU-88) and a machine pistol/Shorty. Long range domination (which is where it counts) and some close range ability, just in case.

Strategy: Flanking. As wide as you possibly can.

Also-did anyone else notice a location change with the "B" objective on Flood Zone?

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Sunday, March 2nd 2014, 5:26am

I disagree with your statements regarding being the bomb planter. You WANT to stick with your team, but that doesn't mean being bunched side by side with two pre-pubescent children with AEKs. I like to run the sides of the map when I'm attacking; he who controls the flanks controls the game. If the majority of your team rushes B, then by all mean, go B, as having support is always welcome, but hang back a little, provide some covering fire but don't get in the thick of things. The reason I don't try to push an objective solo is because I'm afraid there will be a lone wolf camping the objective, while I'll be a sitting duck arming the objective.


Playing this mode slowly will get you nowhere as an attacker. Your greatest chance is the start, where the defenders don't have time to set up properly. I'm not advocating to run headlong in groups of Assaults, but thinking quickly will give you an edge in attacking. Try planning your strategy in the brief respite between games, and try to visualize certain scenarios. Of course, you'll never be fully prepared for anything they do. Only experience can surmount that. However, don't prolong the time unless you've got a really good strategy. Of course, I might be completely wrong.


As for the positioning tactics you recommended, I'll try that out. Does the mid player camp a house/crate and relay information from there, or are they usually mobile? The one problem I see of running the solo operator is if a certain area is compromised; will you be able to arrive to the objective on time? Because CS might have closer bomb points, or some other variable to allow that tactic.

1) I don't suggested necessarily planning a lone-wolf bomb carrier, but sometimes it is necessary. Example, you hang back and most of your team rushes in and gets annihilated. You back out and the rest of the team stays behind and covers your retreat. You then head to the other site. If you were acting as the team more then you could be dead or might still try to push that point.
Your first responsibility as the bomb carrier is to the bomb, not your team. You must act independently, and if that means you hang back or if you take a different route than the majority you do it.

But some of the most successful tactics I've seen is when the entire attacking team draws the defenders into an intense firefight while the bomb planter delays and creeps mid or goes a different direction entirely. If the firefight claims a few defenders then the defenders will likely rotate to that single bomb site and the carrier goes to the opposite one unopposed and plants. If the attacking team steamrolls the defenders, the carrier goes to the safe side and plants while the whole team now protects the planted bomb. If the attacking team looses a few they might try to retreat and push the other site, the carrier in the middle can see how the defenders are reacting to the retreat and offer directions.
It's all based on tactics, but I'll tell you from experience that sometimes the bomb carrier running with the pack is the worst thing you can do.
I didn't mean to suggest that you rush the opposite direction as your team right away, it's all about feints and misdirection.


You said you usually give the bomb away? You said it is too much responsibility for you? You are worrying too much about the team. The team should worry about you, your goal is first and foremost to get the bomb down and that means that if you team is getting F'd in the A around the corner you just run away.


2)You'd be surprised how much a "delay" can play in your favor as an attacker. You give the other team time to set up, but at the same time you also give your team time to set up as well as make the defenders worried. Rushing as fast as you can and clashing in the middle isn't really leaving the game up to tactics as much as it could. Gunplay will most likely decide that outcome.
In CS I've played many successful "delay" tactics. For example, in the map Dust2 it takes a lot more caution to go B because of close quarters and poor sightlines and as such takes more time and more discretion. If you are going to run fast and furious you usually go A from several directions or just entire team rush B but it's usually not wise.
As an attacker, we've bunched up in our spawn out of sight and waited a good amount of time (30 seconds or so). The defenders get curious and uneasy and start peeking. The mid player doesn't see anyone and the A players peek around and don't see anyone. The players at B don't hear anything, but they can't see anything either so it's all a guess.
Between the A and mid players it's decided that A isn't the target, mid rotates to B through mid and the A players fall back through A to cross over to B. Now the attackers rush A and if they are lucky they get a flank on the A players rotating to B and shoot 'em in the back. Bomb planted, 5v3, and the defenders have to fight uphill to get to A.
Unless the attackers are blind or there is a CS god on the defenders it's basically in the bag.
Does it always work? No. When it works does it work well? Hell yes!

You can also delay with bait. Have one or two people rush in one direction, spam grenades, make a big show of a good push, and if they get murdered in the process then oh well. If they did their job and the defenders take the bait, the remaining 3 can push a different direction and catch the defenders off guard.


3) The mid player's role is very complicated. You kind of camp and recon for the start and move about the next. The first objective is to discover the plan and relay information to your team and find out where to go from there.
If you don't see anyone and B calls for help, for example, you respond first and rotate to B and if they still need help the A player(s) should rotate over.
If you see someone and kill them, then A is getting hammered, you might want to push up past your killed enemy and run a flank on whoever is attacking A or fall back and rotate to A to help defend.
If everyone is bum rushing mid, you need to make a call. You can take as many as you can, warn your teammates to be on their toes, and take your death in stride. You can retreat and try and draw them in or push them away depending on how aggressive they are playing. You can pester them and lock them down then wait for backup or a flank to arrive, or try and force them to retreat.
A lot of that will depend on what your players at B or A see/hear/think, what your loadout is, what kind of enemies you are facing, etc.
Being versatile and jack of all trades is what playing mid is all about. Don't snipe, don't PDW, don't shotgun, an AR/Carbine and an explosive is your best bet since you need to be capable CQC as well as at a decent range.
You'll have to be the most adaptable player on the team and you have to be able to think on your feet. You'll be putting on the boots of whoever falls first, running flanks, rescuing the pinned down, making distractions, basically you are the special forces of the squad.


As far as getting around the map if an area is compromised, think of it this way. Rather than running a "sided defense" with 3 at A and 2 at B, you run a balanced defense with 2/1/2. That way if one side is getting hit hard, the support isn't very far away. If nothing else, the mid player can make time for the other 2 to roll around and get there.
If you run a sided defense and the weak side gets hit hard, 3 arriving at once may be a strong force but it will take so long to get there you might be fighting a set up enemy and/or have a major time constraint if the bomb is planted there.
Having someone in the middle to get there and at least slow the attackers down it means the 2 from far away have a better chance that their assault will be successful.

You don't want to run the whole team mid because you are setting yourself up to be flanked, and you don't want to leave one side open either. 2/1/2 is really the best layout for a well prepared and communicative defense.
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